Science activities

Reset filters

35 records


















Records

Sort order
  • Title

    Monitoring and Evaluation of the North Delta Food Subsidies and Colusa Basin Drain Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The North Delta Food Subsidies – Colusa Basin Drain Study monitors and evaluates the effects of the North Delta Flow Action on the Delta food web.
    Science topics Delta Smelt, Fish, Flows, Water management
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Monitoring and Assessment of Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates Action

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates (SMSCGs) have the potential to provide an increase in low-salinity-zone habitat for endangered Delta Smelt. Operation of the SMSCGs in summer and fall to improve Delta Smelt habitat are called for in the Biological Opinion and Incidental Take permit for the Central Valley Project and State Water Project. To support the adaptive management of the action, DWR is planning to monitor the change in water quality, phytoplankton, zooplankton, fishes, and clams resulting from the action.
    Science topics Salinity, Phytoplankton, Delta Smelt
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates Action Pilot Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description In summer 2018 we used a unique water control structure in the San Francisco Estuary to direct a managed flow pulse into Suisun Marsh. Field monitoring showed that turbidity and chlorophyll were at higher levels in Suisun Marsh, representing better habitat conditions, than the upstream Sacramento River region throughout the study period. Fish monitoring data suggested that small numbers of Delta Smelt colonized Suisun Marsh from the Sacramento River during the 2018 Flow Action.
    Science topics Salinity, Phytoplankton, Delta Smelt
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Yolo Bypass Salmonid Habitat Restoration and Fish Passage

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Yolo Bypass Salmonid Habitat Restoration Project works to reconnect the floodplain for fish during the winter season and improve connectivity within the bypass and to the Sacramento River. The project provides seasonal inundation that mimics the natural process of the Yolo Bypass floodplain and improves connectivity within the bypass and to the Sacramento River.
    Science topics Chinook Salmon, Endangered species
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Using Flowcam Technology to Measure High Frequency Spatial and Temporal Variation in Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Species Composition and Develop State-of-the-Art Plankton Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The purpose of this project is to use the new imaging-in-flow instrument FlowCAM to rapidly and automatically identify, enumerate and estimate biomass for in situ and laboratory phytoplankton and zooplankton species composition samples in the SF Estuary.
    Science topics Phytoplankton, Zooplankton
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Analysis of Archived Samples to Assess Patterns of Historic Invasive Bivalve Biomass

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The purpose of this project is to provide information regarding the effect of bivalves in restored habitat by assessing patterns of invasive bivalve biomass. This research is important because these bivalves are invasive and dominant in the upper SF Bay-Delta system, which are considered to be a major sink of primary productivity in the system.
    Science topics Bivalve
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Phytoplankton Communities in the San Francisco Estuary: Monitoring and Management using a Submersible Spectrofluorometer

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The purpose of this project is to evaluate a new submersible spectrofluorometer, the bbe FluoroProbe, for phytoplankton monitoring and management in the SFE. Secondly, this project seeks to investigate high-frequency patterns in spatial phytoplankton group distributions among Delta habitats and along gradients from the western Delta and northern San Francisco Bay.
    Science topics None specified
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Biomass and Toxicity of a Newly Established Bloom of the Cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa and its Potential Impact on Beneficial Use in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Monitoring and simple analysis of the extent of this cyanobacteria in the Delta, and preliminary exploration of the impacts of cystins on drinking water quality, and human and wildlife health.
    Science topics None specified
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gate Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Description Suisun Bay and Marsh are a key part of the habitat for Delta Smelt, but during drier periods such as summer, Delta Smelt may be at least partially excluded from Suisun Marsh due to high salinities. The purpose of this proposal is to provide scientific support a management action for Smelt, operation of the Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates (SMSCG). This facility is currently to tidally pump water into the Marsh to improve fall and winter habitat conditions for waterfowl, but could also provide a tool to manage aquatic habitat for Delta Smelt in other periods. Specifically, by using the SMSCG to direct more fresh water in Suisun Marsh, our prediction is that reduced salinities will improve habitat conditions for Delta Smelt in the region. Need The status of Delta Smelt is dire. As part of the Resources Agency's Delta Smelt Resiliency Strategy, in August 2018 we conducted pilot operations of the SMSCG to support Delta Smelt , with promising results. Based on this early success, we expect that the SMSCG will be used as a seasonal tool to support Delta Smelt in summer-fall in coming years as part of the coming FWS Biological Opinion and DFW ITP. Neither has been completed, but SMSCG operations for fish are expected to be required in each. Hence, the proposed study is intended to provide a scientific evaluation and guidance for an expected SMSCG action in 2020. Objectives The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the effectiveness of the SMSCG action. Questions to be addressed include: • Did the action improve habitat conditions for Delta Smelt in the Suisun Region? • Does the Suisun Region typically have better habitat and food web conditions than the upstream River Region? • Do Delta Smelt respond favorably to the SMSCG flow action? • Does operation of the SMSCG affect other fishes and clams?
    Science topics Salinity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Physiological and Behavioral Effects of Domestication on Delta Smelt

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Description Due to the continued population decline of Delta Smelt and the threat of extinction, conservation efforts may include future supplementation practices using the refuge population of Delta Smelt at the Fish Conservation and Culture Laboratory (FCCL) in Byron, CA to assist in maintaining the wild population. Prior to any supplementation planning, it is first critical to determine if Delta Smelt with varying levels of domestication indices (i.e. level of hatchery ancestry) respond differently, both physiologically and behaviorally, to various habitat conditions. This project aims to provide a better understanding of the effects of domestication on captive Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) by assessing the refuge population at the FCCL. Three studies will be conducted exploring if domestication index (i.e. the level of hatchery ancestry) affects the physiological and behavioral performance of Delta Smelt in response to physical handling and climate change stressors. Need Physiological and behavioral changes of hatchery fish due to domestication could lead to unintended detrimental effects in the wild;therefore, research characterizing the alterations of hatchery Delta Smelt across levels of domestication indices are warranted to understand the effects of captivity and how they might shape future supplementation and conservation strategies. For example, identification of differences among groups of Delta Smelt with varied domestication index may create the need for domestication management and the implementation of altered hatchery practices. This project will provide relevant and timely information for conservation managers and adaptive restoration strategies and dovetail with the recommendations from the 2017 Delta Smelt Supplementation Workshop. As such, this study is included in the supplementation studies work plan which came out of that workshop. Specifically, this project fits within two topics in the IEP Science Strategy: Effects of Climate Change and Extreme Events and Restoring Native Species and Communities. Objectives 1. To characterize domestication effects on hatchery Delta Smelt by synthesizing existing/historical datasets on growth and reproduction of fish at the FCCL since the start of the hatchery program. 2. To identify the impacts of domestication index on the physiological stress response of Delta Smelt following handling stress. 3. To determine the effects of domestication index on individual and group swimming behavior, responses to predation, and responses within the context of climate change factors including warming and increased salinity.
    Science topics Delta Smelt
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    North Delta Flow Action: Role of Improved Yolo Bypass Flows on Delta Food Web Dynamics

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Description In a collaborative effort between CA Department of Water Resources, US Bureau of Reclamation, CA Department of Fish and Wildlife, United States Geological Survey, San Francisco State University, and UC Davis, this study will investigate the role of augmented summer and fall flows in the Yolo Bypass and North Delta areas on lower trophic food web dynamics and the benefits to listed fish species. Using both continuous and discrete sampling approaches, this study will relate hydrologic patterns to chlorophyll-a, nutrients and primary productivity, plankton densities and composition (phytoplankton and zooplankton), contaminant concentrations, as well as water quality parameters such as electrical conductivity, turbidity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen. In addition, caged hatchery Delta Smelt will be monitored to determine the effects of the managed flow action and increased food web productivity on fish survival, growth, and behavior. Need Due to the food-limited nature of the San Francisco Estuary, it is critical to understand mechanisms that result in successful food web productivity including phytoplankton blooms. Food limitation is one of the primary hypothesized causes of the Pelagic Organism Decline. In 2011 and 2012 there was evidence that a moderate Yolo Bypass flow pulse during fall agricultural drainage periods was followed by phytoplankton blooms in the lower Sacramento River. Managed flow actions in the following years showed an increase in food web productivity could be repeated;however, results varied across years and flow actions indicating more research is warranted to understand correlations between flow and abiotic conditions, and the biological response of the food web. The increases of summer/fall flows in North Delta, has been considered a management strategy as part of complying with USFWS Delta Smelt Biological Opinion Action 4. The augmentation of flows through the Yolo Bypass/North Delta is also included as one of several Delta Smelt Resiliency Strategies by Natural Resources Agency. Objectives • Determine if managed flow actions through the Yolo Bypass stimulate increased primary productivity locally and downstream, and if it is repeatable. • Characterize how nutrients, chlorophyll and plankton (composition and density) in the Toe Drain, Cache Slough Complex, and lower Sacramento River change in response to flow pulses. • Determine if nutrient subsidies of the source water and downstream are limited by abiotic and biotic factors. • Characterize spatial differences and transport of pesticide contaminants in the Yolo Bypass in response to the flow actions. • Determine survival, growth and behavior of caged hatchery Delta Smelt before and after the flow action in the Yolo Bypass.
    Science topics Flows, Water management
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Continuous Water Quality Monitoring Stations

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description DWR has conducted water quality monitoring for the California State Water Project since 1968. This program is currently managed by the Division of Operations and Maintenance, Environmental Assessment Branch. Initially, this program sought to monitor eutrophication (an increase in chemical nutrients) and salinity in the SWP. Over time, the water quality program expanded to include parameters of concern for drinking water, recreation, and wildlife. DWR's Division of Operations and Maintenance (O&M) currently maintains 16 continuous water quality monitoring stations located throughout the State Water Project. Data from these automated stations are uploaded to the California Data Exchange Center (CDEC) website. Hourly to daily conductivity, temperature, turbidity, pH, fluorometry, UVA-254 absorption
    Science topics Water temperature, pH, Turbidity, Hydrocarbons / polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAH, Rodenticides, Other discharge contaminants, Intertidal / transition zones, Main channels, Riparian wildlife
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    State Water Project - Reservoir Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The State Water Project (DWR) is responsible for maintaining and monitoring water levels in several key reservoirs in California. The reservoirs of focus (largest capacity) within the CVP are Oroville, San Luis, Pyramid, Perris, and Castaic. San Luis is jointly monitored by USBR and DWR. Reservoir storage, elevation, inflow, and outflow are monitored daily, with some parameters at certain reservoirs being monitored hourly or monthly, and reported to the California Data Exchange Center (CDEC) for public access.
    Science topics Water storage, Surface water / flow, Stage, Flood, Main channels
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Discrete dissolved oxygen monitoring in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Dissolved oxygen levels in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Chanel (SDWSC) have been monitored since 1968 by the Interagency Ecological Program's (IEP) Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP). The SDWSC is located on the San Joaquin River near Stockton, California. Beginning in 1997, 14 stations were routinely monitored typically in summer and fall. Dissolved oxygen impairment can occur in the SDWSC;therefore, two water quality objectives were established.
    Science topics Chlorophyll A / B, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Main channels, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Surface Water Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description DWR continuously monitors surface water quality and hydrology at 49 sites within the Delta. The extensive DWR Central District Surface Water Monitoring network provides continuous data of flow magnitude and direction and general chemical water quality characteristics. Electrical conductivity (EC) is measured continuously at 24 of these stations. Measurements are recorded at 15-minute intervals and then reduced to a report format. At each EC site, equations are available to convert EC to chlorides and total dissolved solids. Several of the EC stations in the Delta also continuously monitor temperature and provide 15-minute temperature data.
    Science topics Surface water / flow, Stage, Precipitation, Water temperature, Turbidity, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Phytoplankton and Chlorophyll-a Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The California DWR Phytoplankton and Chlorophyll-a monitoring measures the composition (what kinds?), abundance (how many?), diversity (how many kinds?), and distribution (where are they?) of phytoplankton. It also measures phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll-a;both types of monitoring are performed as part of the IEP’s Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP).
    Science topics Chlorophyll A / B, Phytoplankton, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Main channels, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    State Water Project

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The California State Water Project (SWP) is a water storage and delivery system of reservoirs, aqueducts, power plants and pumping plants extending more than 700 miles - two-thirds the length of California. Planned, constructed, and operated by the Department of Water Resources, the SWP is the nation's largest state-built, multi-purpose, user-financed water project. It supplies water to more than 27 million people in northern California, the Bay Area, the San Joaquin Valley, the Central Coast and southern California. SWP water also irrigates about 750,000 acres of farmland, mainly in the San Joaquin Valley.
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Surface water / flow, Stage, Main channels, Habitat
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Local Maintaining Agency Annual Reporting

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Additions to the Water Code include requirements for local levee maintaining agencies (Local Agencies) to submit to DWR, by September 30 each year, specific information relative to the Project Levees they operate and maintain. Local Agencies who maintain either (1) Project Levees or (2) Non-Project Levees that also benefit land within the boundaries of an area benefited by a Project Levee, are required to submit five categories of information annually. A Local Agency responsible for operation and maintenance of a levee not otherwise subject to these requirements may voluntarily prepare and submit to DWR or the CVFPB a flood management report for website posting The Flood Project Integrity and Inspection Branch (FPIIB) produces annual inspection reports using summarized levee data acquired through the Local Maintaining Agency Reporting Program.
    Science topics Levees, Stage, Tides, Flood
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Levee Inspections

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description DWR, under the authority of Water Code § 8360, § 8370, and § 8371, performs a verification inspection of the maintenance of the SRFCP levees performed by the local responsible agencies, and reports to the USACE periodically regarding the status of levee maintenance accomplished under the provisions of Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 208.10. While there are no specific water code provisions directing DWR to inspect and report on Maintenance of the San Joaquin River Flood Control System, DWR has performed inspections and provided reports for many years as a matter of practice that is consistent with Title 33, CFR. The inspections thus verify, for both river basins, that local agencies are performing their legal and statutory responsibilities pursuant to Water Code § 12642 and § 12657, and are meeting their legal obligations under assurance agreements with the State to operate and maintain their flood control projects “on any stream flowing into or in, the Sacramento Valley or the San Joaquin Valley”. The State inspects and reports only on the status of maintenance practices and on observable levee conditions. The State does not routinely conduct field studies to assess the structural integrity of the levees or their foundations as part of its annual inspection program. Beginning in 2003, the DWR Flood Project Inspection Section (FPIS) and subsequently the Flood Project Integrity and Inspection Branch (FPIIB) has conducted a field survey of the waterward erosion sites and reported them. In addition, the obvious signs of structural weakness such as longitudinal cracks in the crown or slope of the levee, sloughing, or any other noticeable sign of movement within the cross section of the levee are also reported.
    Science topics Levees, Stage, Tides, Flood
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Aquatic Invasive Species Program [CDFW]

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Aquatic Invasive Species Program is involved in efforts to prevent the introduction of these species into the state, detect and respond to introductions when they occur, and prevent the spread of invasive species that have become established. Our projects address problems with introduced animals and plants, both terrestrial and aquatic. More fundamentally, we try to identify and address the ways by which the species are introduced, typically inadvertently, by human activities. Studies show that preventing introductions is the most effective and cost-efficient way to manage invasive species. The program conducts work in coordination with other government agencies and non-governmental organizations. The seven state agencies with lead AIS responsibilities are the California Department of Fish & Game (DFG), the California Department of Food and Agriculture (DFA), the California Department of Boating and Waterways (DBW), the California State Lands Commission (SLC), the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), the State Coastal Conservancy (SCC), the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) and nine regional water quality control boards (RQWCBs) It appears CDFW currently focuses on Quagga/Zebra Mussels, New Zealand Mudsnail, Channeled Apple Snail, Didymosphenia, Hydrilla, and water milfoil.
    Science topics Recreation & tourism, Main channels, Sloughs, Submerged aquatic vegetation, Managed ponds, Mollusks, Saltwater / freshwater marshes, Habitat, Other species, Invasive / non native species, Vessels and shipping channels
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Fisheries Branch Anadromous Assessment

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Fisheries Branch Anadromous Assessment Unit compiles annual population estimates of Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Estimates are based on counts of fish entering hatcheries and migrating past dams, carcass surveys, live fish counts, creel census data, and ground and aerial redd counts.
    Science topics Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater, Seasonally flooded, Open water, Chinook Salmon
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Environmental Monitoring Program [EMP]: Discrete Water Quality Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description There are 24 fixed discrete stations within the San Francisco Estuary that are monitored at high water slack tide. The stations are primarily accessed by the Research Vessel Sentinel, or vehicle transport. Discrete sampling is completed once a month due to the intensity of collecting a wide collection of physical parameters (e.g. water temperature) and grab samples for laboratory analysis (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorous). The data from the discrete sampling is helpful to document long-term changes within the estuary.
    Science topics Tides, Wind, Nitrogen / ammonia, Phosphorous, Carbon, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Main channels, Sloughs, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Sturgeon Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Staff of the Sturgeon Study make estimates of sturgeon abundance, relative abundance, harvest rate, and survival rate by using data from Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessels (Party Boats;CPFV), various creel surveys, and a mark-recapture program. We monitor the relative abundance of sturgeon by calculating catch per unit effort (CPUE) from data submitted by Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessels. The Department's Marine Region compiles the data, we request the data at intervals, and we calculate CPUE. By applying tags to sturgeon and monitoring the subsequent ratio of tagged fish to untagged fish, we calculate sturgeon abundance, relative abundance, harvest rate, and survival rate. During August-October we use nets in San Pablo Bay and/or Suisun Bay to collect sturgeon, then we tag and release them on-site. Each tag includes our mailing address and a unique code, and some tags include a reward value. By posting "Tagged-fish Wanted" posters around the Estuary and making presentations, we encourage anglers to return tags to us. We also recover tags by talking with anglers during various creel surveys.
    Science topics Main channels, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Habitat
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Zooplankton Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Zooplankton Study has estimated the abundance of zooplankton taxa since 1972 as a means of assessing trends in fish food resources from eastern San Pablo Bay through the eastern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Marsh. The study also detects and monitors zooplankton recently introduced to the estuary and determines their effects on native species. Under the auspices of the Interagency Ecological Program for the San Francisco Estuary and mandated by Water Right Decision D-1641, the Zooplankton Study is part of the Environmental Monitoring Program and is conducted by the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), California Department of Water Resources (CDWR), and the United States Bureau of Reclamation. The Zooplankton Study currently samples 19 stations monthly, including 17 fixed stations and 2 floating entrapment zone stations located at bottom electrical conductivity (EC) of 2 and 6 mS/cm. Three additional stations are sampled in Carquinez Strait and San Pablo Bay during high outflow when surface EC is less than 20mS/cm.
    Science topics Mysis, Other zooplankton, Main channels, Sloughs, Crustaceans, Invertebrates
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Multibeam Delta Bathymetry Surveys

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The California Department of Water Resources (CA-DWR), North Central Region Office (NCRO), Bathymetry and Technical Support Section has conducted bathymetry surveys in the Delta since 2011 (according to the Bathymetry Catalog). Data have been used to support planning for the installation of behavioural fish barriers, to assess the river’s channel capacity and ability to convey flows, to assess water quality dynamics, to better understand the area’s risk of flooding and to improve the quality of flood hazard data and maps available to local communities (under the DWR’s FloodSAFE California Initiative), to improve knowledge of sediment presence and movement, to provide high-resolution bathymetry data for hydraulic models, to assess the placement of a drought barrier, to determine how the channel bottom is evolving due to the installation of an emergency drought barrier, and to determine the effects of fish passage projects.
    Science topics Flood, Land elevation, Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Feather River Hatchery/ Oroville Facility Fishery Studies

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description DWR conducts Feather River fishery studies to estimate adult abundance for both spring-run and fall-run Chinook salmon, and to conduct tagging studies using young fish from Feather River Hatchery. Our program has expanded in recent years and also supports additional fishery studies commissioned for the Oroville Facilities relicensing through the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The Feather River Fish Hatchery is a joint operation between CDFW and DWR. Generally, CDFW is responsible for raising and releasing the fish. DWR operates the fish traps and analyzes the data for returns and populations. According to their website, of the 5 hatcheries (Feather, Coleman, Nimbus and ??) Feather accounts for most ocean catch. The hatchery also monitors and reports returning adults (https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/documents/ContextDocs.aspx?cat=Fisheries--FishProductionDistribution&sub=Anadromous_Fish_Trap_Counts)
    Science topics Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description California Department of Water Resources (DWR) has operated a fisheries monitoring program in the Yolo Bypass, a seasonal floodplain and tidal slough, since 1998. The objectives of the Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring Program (YBFMP) are to: (1) collect baseline data on lower trophic levels (phytoplankton, zooplankton, and aquatic insects), juvenile fish and adult fish, hydrology, and water quality parameters;(2) investigation of the temporal and seasonal patterns in chlorophyll-a concentrations, including whether high concentrations are exported from the Bypass during agricultural and natural flow events and the possibility of manipulating bypass flows to benefit listed species like Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). The YBFMP operates a rotary screw trap and fyke trap, and conducts biweekly beach seine and lower trophic surveys in addition to maintaining water quality instrumentation in the bypass. The YBFMP serves to fill information gaps regarding environmental conditions in the bypass that trigger migrations and enhanced survival and growth of native fishes, as well as provide data for IEP synthesis efforts.
    Science topics Surface water / flow, Stage, Velocity, Direction, Tides, Flood, Chlorophyll A / B, Phytoplankton, Other zooplankton, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Other discharge contaminants, Mudflats, Intertidal / transition zones, Main channels, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Insects, Striped bass, Conductivity, Saltwater / freshwater marshes, Fish, Invasive / non native species
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Periodic Groundwater Level Measurements

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Since 2009, the California Statewide Groundwater Elevation Monitoring (CASGEM) Program has tracked seasonal and long-term groundwater elevation trends in groundwater basins statewide. The program's mission is to establish a permanent, locally-managed program of regular and systematic monitoring in all of California's alluvial groundwater basins. This early attempt to monitor groundwater continues to exist as a tool to help achieve the goals set out under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA). Senate Bill x7-6, passed by the legislature in 2009, established collaboration between local monitoring parties and DWR to collect statewide groundwater elevations, to be made available to the public. In response to the law, we developed the CASGEM program. Collecting and evaluating these groundwater data on a statewide scale is a fundamental step toward improving management of California's groundwater resources. The CASGEM program relies and builds upon the many previously established local long-term groundwater monitoring and management programs. Our role is to coordinate the CASGEM program, to work cooperatively with local entities, and to maintain the collected elevation data in a readily and widely available public database.
    Science topics Groundwater, Flood
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Municipal Water Quality Investigation Program [MWQI]

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description DWR's municipal water quality monitoring program studies the effect the Delta has on quality, treatability, and reliability of source waters for municipal use. Discrete water quality samples are collected monthly and biweekly throughout the Delta. The Real Time Data and Forecasting-Comprehensive Program (RTDF-CP) collects continuous data at 5 key locations in the Delta, State Water Project and Central Valley Project, coalesces the data into graphs, and provides model-based water quality forecasts. Together, these resources are essential tools for drinking water purveyors in efficiently managing water treatment operations. MWQI monitoring data are used in drinking water supply studies, to identify long-term trends in drinking water quality, and to help DWR and other agencies research and mitigate drinking water issues in Delta waters and the SWP. Additionally, in collaboration with the BDO, O&M EAB, and OCO, monitoring data are used to further develop the "early warning" system that provides advance notice to Delta water users of possible drinking water quality problems. Monitoring data are collected by two different monitoring strategies;1) discrete grab samples, and 2) continuous real-time monitoring via remotely located instrumentation. Municipal water quality monitoring parameters include: Organic carbon, Anions, Cations, Salinity, Nutrients, Chlorophyll, Metals, and Total dissolved solids
    Science topics Water conveyance / infrastructure, Agriculture, Nitrogen / ammonia, Phosphorous, Carbon, Chlorophyll A / B, Detritus, Harmful algal blooms HAB, Phytoplankton, Other zooplankton, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Hg and methyl mercury, Polychlorinated biphenyl PCB, Hydrocarbons / polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAH, Flame retardants, Endocrine disruptors, Lead, Cadmium, Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Selenium, Constituent of emerging concern CEC, Insecticides, Rodenticides, Herbicides, Fungicides, Microplastics, Other discharge contaminants, Main channels, Sloughs, Fecal coliform / E. coli
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Quality Assurance & Quality Control [QA/QC] Program

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The QA/QC Program implements our QA/QC Policy through Water Resources Engineering Memo (WREM) 60 (PDF). WREM 60 establishes our policies and procedures to assure that quality assurance is used in our chemical and physical measurements, data collection, and data measurement and management activities. Our QA/QC Program ensures that all water-related data is collected in a way that is scientifically sound, legally defensible, comparable and compatible with State and federal agencies, and is properly documented. All of our divisions, districts, contractors, and agency cooperators performing measurement activities are subject to the provisions of WREM 60. QA/QC protocols include: Standard operating procedures Quality assurance templates Quality control standards Quality assurance assessments Department-wide quality assurance guidance documents
    Science topics Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Hg and methyl mercury, Polychlorinated biphenyl PCB, Hydrocarbons / polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAH, Flame retardants, Endocrine disruptors, Lead, Cadmium, Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Selenium, Constituent of emerging concern CEC, Insecticides, Rodenticides, Herbicides, Fungicides, Microplastics, Nitrogen / ammonia, Other discharge contaminants, Fecal coliform / E. coli
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    California Irrigation Management Information System [CIMIS]

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS) is a program unit in the Water Use and Efficiency Branch, Division of Statewide Integrated Water Management, California Department of Water Resources (DWR) that manages a network of over 145 automated weather stations in California. CIMIS was developed in 1982 by DWR and the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). It was designed to assist irrigators in managing their water resources more efficiently. Efficient use of water resources benefits Californians by saving water, energy, and money.
    Science topics Air temperature, Precipitation, Wind, Solar irradiance, Extreme heat, Environmental drivers, Water use / demand, Evaporation / evapotranspiration
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Suisun Marsh Monitoring Program

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Suisun Marsh Monitoring Program is a monitoring program to collect data on surface and soil water quality, water elevations, vegetation, and wildlife species, required by the Suisun Marsh Preservation Agreement (SMPA) that was signed by DWR, the California Department of Fish and Game (DFG), U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and Suisun Resource Conservation District (SRCD).
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Salinity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Well Completion Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description California Water Code Section 13751 requires that anyone who constructs, alters, or destroys a water well, cathodic protection well, groundwater monitoring well, or geothermal heat exchange well must file with the Department of Water Resources a report of completion within 60 days of the completion of the work. Drillers submit their well completion reports with the Online System of Well Completion Reports (OSWCR). OSWCR users create an account based on their C-57 license that DWR will validate. Upon approval users will be able to submit Well Completion Reports.
    Science topics Water conveyance / infrastructure, Groundwater
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    California Cooperative Snow Surveys [CCSS] program

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Established in 1929 by the California Legislature, the California Cooperative Snow Surveys (CCSS) program is a partnership of more than 50 state, federal, and private agencies. The cooperating agencies not only share a pool of expert staff but share in funding the program, which collects, analyzes and disseminates snow data from more than 265 snow courses and 130 snow sensors located throughout the Sierra Nevada and Shasta-Trinity mountains. California is the only western state to perform this function on its own. In the other western states, snow surveys are done by the federally funded Natural Resources Conservation Service, which began its program in the mid-1930s. Both programs are similar, and there is a high degree of cooperation between the two entities. DWR is the lead agency in coordinating the CCSS program, which includes: -Maintaining snow surveying and sampling equipment -Training for our partner agencies -Course measurement schedules and data collection -Fiscal and staff resource needs for the various partners within the program. While monitoring doesn't occur in the Delta, snowmelt estimates are used to develop streamflow forecasts for the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers that flow through the Delta.
    Science topics Water storage, Surface water / flow, Flood, Air temperature, Precipitation, Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater, Seasonally flooded, Riparian wildlife, Snowpack / snow water equivalent SWE
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Precipitation Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description DWR monitoring real-time, daily, and monthly precipitation throughout California.
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Precipitation, Riparian wildlife, Non-forested vegetation, Delta islands, Pacific flyway, Water use / demand
    Updated April 29, 2022