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  • Title

    Juvenile salmon distribution, abundance, and growth in restored and relict Delta marsh habitats

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description Project is to conduct a study that will to determine whether observed salmon responses match the assumptions and expectations of habitat suitability and life-cycle models currently guiding resource management and habitat restoration in the Bay-Delta, while at the same time supplying much-needed quantitative information to improve these models. The broader purpose is to improve these models to allow more objective and accurate predictions of alternative management and restoration actions intended to recover Central Valley salmon populations. The overarching goal of this project is to quantify the distribution, abundance, residence time and growth of juvenile salmon within the Bay-Delta.
    Science topics None specified
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    An Improved Genomics Tool for Characterizing Life History Diversity and Promotinf Resilience in Central Valley Chinook Salmon

    Lead Michigan State University
    Description This study will improve our ability to protect the diversity of traits in Chinook salmon. The diversity of Chinook salmon migration timing is decreasing in the Central Valley. A key roadblock to protecting diversity is the current inability to rapidly and inexpensively identify large numbers of individuals from different populations during their migration to the ocean. This study addresses this information gap by leveraging pre-existing genomic data to develop a new technique that will allow scientists to identify individuals to life history type and location. For example, this study will potentially be able to identify Fall Run Chinook that are from the Sacramento versus the San Joaquin River basins. This information, in combination with data on water temperature and river flows, can determine the relationship between environmental conditions and juvenile salmon life history diversity. The information generated by this work will provide managers with the ability to accurately monitor the effect of key management actions on the different Central Valley Chinook salmon populations.
    Science topics None specified
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Phytoplankton and cyanobacteria growth and response to stressors

    Lead University of California - Davis [UC Davis]
    Description Pesticide and nutrient inputs from human activities are present in the Sacramenot-San Joaquin Bay-Delta, but the impact of these stressors together on algae is not well known. This research will examine the impacts of herbicides and nutrients on the growth and stress responses of phytoplankton and cyanobacteria present in the San Francisco Estuary. The algae in the delta are diverse with critical ecological effects, ranging from toxin-producing cyanobacteria that form hazardous algal blooms to benthic diatoms and green algae that make up the bulk of the aquatic food web. Contaminants and herbicides can cause changes in algae cellular health which may impact population growth. Understanding algal sub-lethal stress responses will improve our understanding of stressors on the bay-delta food web and bloom formation.
    Science topics Phytoplankton, Cyanobacteria
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Delta Regional Monitoring Program

    Lead San Francisco Estuary Institute [SFEI]
    Description The Delta Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) is a stakeholder-directed project formed to develop water quality data necessary for improving our understanding of Delta water quality issues.
    Science topics Hg and methyl mercury, Insecticides, Rodenticides, Herbicides, Fungicides, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Striped bass, Fish
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Central Valley Project - Reservoir Monitoring

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description The Central Valley Project (USBR) is responsible for maintaining and monitoring water levels in several key reservoirs in California. The reservoirs of focus (largest capacity) within the CVP are Folsom, Whiskeytown, Shasta, Trinity, San Luis, and Millerton. San Luis is jointly monitored by USBR and DWR. Reservoir storage, elevation, inflow, and outflow are monitored daily, with some parameters at certain reservoirs being monitored hourly or monthly, and reported to the California Data Exchange Center (CDEC) for public access.
    Science topics Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Surface water / flow, Stage, Flood, Precipitation, Main channels, Water use / demand, Evaporation / evapotranspiration
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Water Quality Data for California

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description The USGS collects and analyzes chemical, physical, and biological properties of water, sediment and tissue samples from across the Nation. The Water Data for the Nation discrete sample data base is a compilation of over 4.4 million historical water quality analyses in the USGS district data bases through September 2005. The discrete sample data is a large and complex set of data that has been collected by a variety of projects ranging from national programs to studies in small watersheds.
    Science topics Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    20-mm Survey [Delta Smelt distribution monitoring]

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) conducts the 20-mm Survey annually to monitor the distribution and relative abundance of larval and juvenile Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) in the upper San Francisco Bay Estuary. The survey began in 1995 and supplies near real-time catch data to water and fisheries managers as part of an adaptive management strategy to limit the risk of Delta Smelt entrainment during water exports Data collected: temperature, electro-conductivity, water transparency, turbidity, water volume, tidal stage, fish, and zooplankton.
    Science topics Stage, Tides, Other zooplankton, Water temperature, Turbidity, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Benthos
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Contra Costa Water District Source Water Monitoring

    Lead Contra Costa Water District [CCWD]
    Description CCWD source water monitoring provides information on Delta water prior to intake and treatment for water supply. Conduct monitoring at several water supply sites located near the intakes of (or inside) the California and North Bay aqueducts and Contra Costa Canal. Water supply programs monitor general water quality and a wide range of constituents of concern relevant to drinking water, including nutrients, OC, bromide, pathogens, and pesticides.
    Science topics Nitrogen / ammonia, Harmful algal blooms HAB, Salinity, pH, Turbidity, Lead, Copper, Other discharge contaminants, Conductivity, Fecal coliform / E. coli
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Central Valley Project

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description The CVP is one of the largest water storage and transport systems in the world, comprised of 20 reservoirs and more than 500 miles of canals. This project provides water used to irrigate more than 3 million acres of agricultural land and has a total reservoir storage of 11,363,000 acre-feet.
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Surface water / flow, Stage, Flood
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Benthic Organism Study

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description This program operates under the Interagency Ecological Program's (IEP) Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP). "The Benthic Organism monitoring effort was started in 1975 and currently monitors 10 sites across the estuary's salinity gradient, from Suisun Bay upstream to Clifton Court Forebay and Stockton, on a monthly basis. Benthic invertebrates are collected with a PONAR grab, preserved, identified, and enumerated. In addition to mandated monthly monitoring of benthic invertebrates, we also conducted special studies of benthic invertebrates using spatial intensive sampling schemes. These special studies complement the long-running mandated monitoring and provide a more comprehensive picture of the benthic community of the Upper San Francisco Estuary." Changes in benthic fauna presence, abundance and distribution associates physical factors are measured in the estuary to evaluate the impacts of water project operations. 426 species in 10 phyla have been collected to date. Data is also used to detect introduced species. Sediment composition data also collected to document general trends at sites where benthic organisms are collected. https://emp.baydeltalive.com/projects/12727/page
    Science topics Suspended sediment, Bedload, Deposition, Erosion, Insects, Mollusks, Crustaceans
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    San Francisco Bay Bathymetry

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description USGS has conducted bathymetric analyses in San Francisco Bay, Suisun Bay, and the Delta intermittently since 1867 based on bathymetry data primarily collected by NOAA"s National Ocean Service (NOS) (formerly the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (USCGS)). Since the days of hydraulic gold mining, sedimentation in San Francisco Bay has changed drastically. From the 1850's until at least the late 1800's, debris from hydraulic mining in the Sierra Nevada filled the Bay. As hydraulic mining practices ceased, the amount of sediment deposited decreased. In the latter half of the 20th century an increase in the implementation of flood control and water distribution projects in the Central Valley caused the Bay to be erosional due to the reduction of the frequency and duration of peak flow conditions, which in turn decreased sediment supply to the Bay. They have used this information to locate deposits of sediment-associated contaminants, restore wetland areas, and to provide the observable linkage between anthropogenic modifications of the landscape—such as evolving land use practices, flood control, and water diversions—and natural forces of climate-driven river flow, sea level change, tides, and wind. In 1999, USGS assessed how sedimentation in the Suisun Bay has changed between 1867 and 1990 (see info sources). They have also worked collaboratively with DWR, using their more recent bathymetry data to produce a high-resolution DEM of the Delta region (see info sources). It is not clear whether USGS will continue their bathymetry surveys. The latest survey is from 2005, and took place in the South of San Francisco Bay (outside the Delta study area).
    Science topics Flood, Land elevation, Bedload, Deposition, Erosion, Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Freeport Regional Water Project

    Lead East Bay Municipal Utilities District
    Description The Freeport Regional Water Authority (FRWP) is a cooperative effort of the Sacramento County Water Agency (SCWA) and the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) of Oakland to supply surface water from the Sacramento River to customers in central Sacramento County and the East Bay area of California.
    Science topics Surface water / flow, Stage, Drought, Environmental drivers
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Levee Waterside Erosion Surveys

    Lead U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE]
    Description The USACE, with DWR sponsorship, has contracted for waterside erosion surveys of the Sacramento River system since 1998. As stated earlier, FPIIB began conducting waterside erosion surveys of the San Joaquin River portion of the State-Federal flood protection system Project levees in September of 2006. The primary purpose of these surveys is to: a) inspect the waterside levees for erosion activity, b) document and report new erosion sites, c) document and report the current condition of previously identified erosion sites, and d) rank and rate the severity of erosion sites based upon the findings from the field survey. The USACE and its contractors generate the report on erosion found in the Sacramento River system;FPIIB staff supplements their inspection reports with the USACE data as it becomes available.
    Science topics Water conveyance / infrastructure, Levees, Stage, Tides, Flood
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Drought Stressor Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The state of California recently experienced a severe drought and one of the warmest and driest periods of recorded history. The drought lasted for five years, from 2012 to 2016. On January 17, 2014, Governor Jerry Brown declared the drought a state of emergency. This proclamation directed all state agencies to act to prepare for and mitigate drought-related effects on water supply and aquatic species. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) responded by developing and implementing “Drought Stressor Monitoring”. In late 2016 to early 2017, drought conditions improved considerably throughout most of the state when winter storms delivered higher than average levels of rainfall. This report describes the results from a collaborative monitoring effort carried out during the period 2014 to 2017 by scientists from California Department of Fish and Wildlife and other agencies throughout the state.
    Science topics Dissolved oxygen, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Fish, Amphibians and reptiles
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Telemetered Stream Gauge Stations [Surface Water Monitoring]

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description A network of stream gauges record and telemeter river stage information. Flow measurements by field crews help calibrate and confirm calculations. Data from stream gage telemetry requires careful consideration as field conditions and equipment malfunctions can provide erroneous readings. A more accurate assessment of actual flow rates requires a review of the flow record and processing to account for actual conditions.
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Surface water / flow, Stage, Flood, Main channels, Sloughs
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Water Quality Monitoring

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description Water Quality includes a program of real-time telemetry, generally with 15-minute reporting to the California Data Exchange Center. In addition, the SJRRP initiated a program of manual water quality constituent measurements. Reclamation will evaluate shallow groundwater, irrigation supply, subsurface drain system and San Joaquin River water quality for SJRRP seepage investigations.
    Science topics Chlorophyll A / B, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Insecticides, Rodenticides, Herbicides, Fungicides, Other discharge contaminants, Main channels, Sloughs, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Sacramento Watershed Coordinated Monitoring Program [SWCMP]

    Lead Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board [Central Valley RWQCB]
    Description SWCMP is a coordinated monitoring effort between DWR and Central Valley RWQCB. This program monitors ambient water quality at locations in the Sacramento River starting upstream of Lake Shasta and going south to Verona, and at the lower end of all large streams tributary to the Sacramento River. It is funded jointly by DWR Northern District Water Quality Section and the Central Valley RWQCB SWAMP. The SWCMP is designed to meet the monitoring needs of the Regional Board’s Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP) and the DWR Northern District’s Water Quality and Biology section. Coordination allows both agencies to maximize the use of their limited resources.
    Science topics Nitrogen / ammonia, Phosphorous, Carbon, Suspended sediment, Toxicity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Lead, Cadmium, Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Selenium, Other discharge contaminants, Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater, Benthos, Insects, Mollusks, Crustaceans, Conductivity, Invertebrates
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    California Rice Commission [CA Rice] Groundwater Monitoring

    Lead California Rice Commission
    Description In 1997, 28 rice wells were installed by the USGS. Since then, several of the wells have been destroyed or replaced and new wells have been installed to complement the original wells. Currently, 24 wells are active and used for water level monitoring and groundwater quality sampling. After two full network sampling events, the USGS used five network wells for trend monitoring as part of the USGS National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Cycle II groundwater monitoring activities (from 2004 to 2014). Under the current monitoring program, now in Cycle III (2014 to 2024), water level monitoring is conducted bi-annually. In 2017, water quality monitoring will include the full network of active wells
    Science topics Agriculture, Groundwater, Nitrogen / ammonia, Suspended sediment, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Seasonally flooded, Non-forested vegetation, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    San Francisco Bay Study

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The San Francisco Bay Study (Bay Study) was established in 1980 to determine the effects of freshwater outflow on the abundance and distribution of fish and mobile crustaceans in the San Francisco Estuary, primarily downstream of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Sampling ranges from south of the Dumbarton Bridge in South San Francisco Bay, to just west of Alcatraz Island in Central San Francisco Bay, throughout San Pablo and Suisun bays, north to the confluence Steamboat and Cache sloughs on the Sacramento River, and east to Old River Flats on the San Joaquin River. The open water or boat survey samples 52 stations monthly: 35 original stations, 7 stations added in 1988, 4 stations added in 1991, and 6 stations added in 1994. The study included a beach seine survey, discontinued in 1987, and a shore-based ringnet survey for crabs, discontinued in 1994. The Bay Study uses a 42-foot stern trawler to sample with 2 trawl nets at each open water station. The otter trawl, which samples demersal fishes, shrimp, and crabs, is towed against the current at a standard engine rpm for 5 minutes then retrieved. The midwater trawl, which samples pelagic fishes, is towed with the current at a standard engine rpm for 12 minutes and retrieved obliquely such that all depths are sampled equally. The open water survey included a plankton net that sampled larval fish and crustaceans, but this was discontinued in 1989. Fish, caridean shrimp, and brachyuran crabs are identified, measured, and counted. Shrimp and crabs are also sexed. Sampling effort is quantified (i.e. distance towed, volume of water filtered) and salinity, water temperature, Secchi depth, and station depth are measured;wave height, tide, cloud cover, and tow direction are categorized. The length, catch, and effort data is used to calculate catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) by species and age class. The CPUE data is used to calculate monthly and annual abundance indices, which are used to track seasonal and annual population trends. Important factors that control or regulate abundance and distribution of fish and mobile crustaceans in the estuary include salinity, temperature, freshwater outflow, ocean temperature, upwelling, and surface currents, primary and secondary productivity, and introduced species. We are interested in how species respond to changes in the physical environment on several temporal scales - seasonal, annual, decadal, and longer. We produce several annual Status and Trends reports that summarize recent changes for the most commonly collected species. These reports are published in the Spring issue of the IEP Newsletter, which can be found at http://iep.water.ca.gov/report/newsletter. The 1999 IEP Technical Report, "Report on the 1980-1995 Fish, Shrimp, and Crab Sampling in the San Francisco Estuary, California", is a good source of basic information. This report is out-of-print, but can be found at www.water.ca.gov/iep/docs/tech_rpts/tech_rprt_63_toc.html. website: https://water.ca.gov/-/media/DWR-Website/Web-Pages/Programs/Environmental-Services/Interagency-Ecological-Program/Files/2019-IEP-Work-Plan_2018-12-11.pdf?la=en&hash=C305D1B1DA7931D95E8676247669F098F26A28FA
    Science topics Water temperature, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Crustaceans, Conductivity, Mammals
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Program [GAMA]

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description The Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is California's comprehensive groundwater quality monitoring program that was created by the State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) in 2000. It was later expanded by Assembly Bill 599 - the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001. AB 599 required the State Water Board, in coordination with an Interagency Task Force (ITF) and Public Advisory Committee (PAC) to integrate existing monitoring programs and design new program elements as necessary, resulting in a publicly accepted plan to monitor and assess groundwater quality in basins that account for 95% of the state's groundwater use. The GAMA Program is based on interagency collaboration with the State and Regional Water Boards, Department of Water Resources, Department of Pesticide Regulations, U.S. Geological Survey, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and cooperation with local water agencies and well owners.
    Science topics Groundwater, Salinity, Hg and methyl mercury, Hydrocarbons / polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAH, Flame retardants, Endocrine disruptors, Lead, Arsenic, Selenium, Constituent of emerging concern CEC, Nitrogen / ammonia, Other discharge contaminants, Conductivity, Habitat, Fecal coliform / E. coli
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Fisheries Branch Anadromous Assessment

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Fisheries Branch Anadromous Assessment Unit compiles annual population estimates of Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Estimates are based on counts of fish entering hatcheries and migrating past dams, carcass surveys, live fish counts, creel census data, and ground and aerial redd counts.
    Science topics Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater, Seasonally flooded, Open water, Chinook Salmon
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Environmental Monitoring Program [EMP]: Discrete Water Quality Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description There are 24 fixed discrete stations within the San Francisco Estuary that are monitored at high water slack tide. The stations are primarily accessed by the Research Vessel Sentinel, or vehicle transport. Discrete sampling is completed once a month due to the intensity of collecting a wide collection of physical parameters (e.g. water temperature) and grab samples for laboratory analysis (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorous). The data from the discrete sampling is helpful to document long-term changes within the estuary.
    Science topics Tides, Wind, Nitrogen / ammonia, Phosphorous, Carbon, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Main channels, Sloughs, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Smelt Larva Survey

    Lead California State Water Resources Control Board [SWRCB]
    Description The Smelt Larva Survey provides near real-time distribution data for longfin smelt larvae in the Delta, Suisun Bay and Suisun Marsh. Sampling takes place within the first two weeks in January and repeats every other week through the second week in March. Each 4-day survey consists of a single 10-minute oblique tow conducted at each of the 35 survey locations (see map) using an egg and larva net. The 505-micron mesh net is hung on a rigid frame shaped like an inverted-U, which in turn is attached to skis to prevent it from digging into the bottom when deployed. The net mouth area measures 0.37 m2. The conical net tapers back from the frame 3.35 m to a 1-liter cod-end jar, which collects and concentrates the sample. Immediately after each tow, juvenile fishes are removed, identified, measured and returned to the water immediately, and the remaining larvae are preserved in 10% formalin for later identification in the Lab in Stockton.
    Science topics Stage, Salinity, Water temperature, Turbidity, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Spring Kodiak Trawl Survey

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The Spring Kodiak Trawl Survey (SKT) has sampled annually since its inception in 2002. The SKT determines the relative abundance and distribution of spawning delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus). The SKT samples 40 stations each month from January to May. These 40 stations range from San Pablo Bay upstream to Stockton on the San Joaquin River, Walnut Grove on the Sacramento River, and the Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel. Each 'Delta-wide' survey takes approximately 4 - 5 days per month to complete. Historically, 'Delta-wide' surveys were followed by a 'Supplemental' survey two weeks later to intensively sample areas of highest delta smelt concentration to estimate the proportion of male and female delta smelt that were in pre-spawning, spawning and spent maturation stages. Beginning in 2008, in an effort to minimize take of spawning adults, routine 'Supplemental' surveys were discontinued and are now only conducted under the recommendation of the Smelt Working Group and the approval of managers.
    Science topics Stage, Salinity, Water temperature, Turbidity, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Conductivity, Other species
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Striped Bass Study

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description Staff of the Striped Bass Study calculate adult Striped Bass abundance, relative abundance, harvest rate, and survival rate by using data from Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessels (Party Boats;CPFV), various creel surveys, and a mark-recapture program. We monitor the relative abundance of adult Striped Bass by calculating catch per unit effort (CPUE) from data submitted by Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessels. The Department's Marine Region compiles the data, we request the data at intervals, and we calculate CPUE. By applying tags to adult Striped Bass and monitoring the subsequent ratio of tagged fish to untagged fish, we calculate adult Striped Bass abundance, relative abundance, harvest rate, and survival rate. During April and May we use large traps near Knights Landing and nets near Antioch to collect adult Striped Bass, then we tag and release them on-site. Each tag includes our mailing address and a unique code, and some tags include a reward value. By posting "Tagged-fish Wanted" posters around the Estuary and making presentations, we encourage anglers to return tags to us. We also recover tags by talking with anglers during various creel surveys.
    Science topics Water temperature, Main channels, Striped bass
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Sturgeon Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Staff of the Sturgeon Study make estimates of sturgeon abundance, relative abundance, harvest rate, and survival rate by using data from Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessels (Party Boats;CPFV), various creel surveys, and a mark-recapture program. We monitor the relative abundance of sturgeon by calculating catch per unit effort (CPUE) from data submitted by Commercial Passenger Fishing Vessels. The Department's Marine Region compiles the data, we request the data at intervals, and we calculate CPUE. By applying tags to sturgeon and monitoring the subsequent ratio of tagged fish to untagged fish, we calculate sturgeon abundance, relative abundance, harvest rate, and survival rate. During August-October we use nets in San Pablo Bay and/or Suisun Bay to collect sturgeon, then we tag and release them on-site. Each tag includes our mailing address and a unique code, and some tags include a reward value. By posting "Tagged-fish Wanted" posters around the Estuary and making presentations, we encourage anglers to return tags to us. We also recover tags by talking with anglers during various creel surveys.
    Science topics Main channels, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Habitat
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Summer Townet Survey

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The Summer Townet (STN) Survey was initiated in 1959 to determine relative distribution and abundance of young of the year (age-0) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Delta. To predict fishery recruitment, the survey calculates an index to measure age-0 striped bass year class strength. This index is based on abundance when age-0 striped bass attain a mean length of 38.1 mm. In contrast, the delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) index is the average of the first two survey indices. The delta smelt index was developed about 1990 in response to declining delta smelt abundance. It has proven valuable in gauging the health of the estuary;delta smelt abundance trend data was used as supporting evidence for their listing as threatened in 1992 under the Federal and State Endangered Species Acts. It appears that zooplankton data are also collected.
    Science topics Mysis, Other zooplankton, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Striped bass, Fish
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Zooplankton Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Zooplankton Study has estimated the abundance of zooplankton taxa since 1972 as a means of assessing trends in fish food resources from eastern San Pablo Bay through the eastern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Marsh. The study also detects and monitors zooplankton recently introduced to the estuary and determines their effects on native species. Under the auspices of the Interagency Ecological Program for the San Francisco Estuary and mandated by Water Right Decision D-1641, the Zooplankton Study is part of the Environmental Monitoring Program and is conducted by the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), California Department of Water Resources (CDWR), and the United States Bureau of Reclamation. The Zooplankton Study currently samples 19 stations monthly, including 17 fixed stations and 2 floating entrapment zone stations located at bottom electrical conductivity (EC) of 2 and 6 mS/cm. Three additional stations are sampled in Carquinez Strait and San Pablo Bay during high outflow when surface EC is less than 20mS/cm.
    Science topics Mysis, Other zooplankton, Main channels, Sloughs, Crustaceans, Invertebrates
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Suisun Marsh Fish Study

    Lead University of California - Davis [UC Davis]
    Description The University of California, Davis has been involved in fish and wildlife monitoring and research within Suisun Marsh for 35 years and has been instrumental in detecting important trends associated with naturally fluctuating environmental conditions as well as anthropogenic influences. Research has included a 35+ year time series on the fish and invertebrate communities of the slough networks, research on waterfowl nesting patterns and population biology, and research on the demography of salt marsh harvest mouse. The Suisun Marsh Fish Study anchors this effort as it is the longest established survey in Suisun marsh. It will continue the research of Professor Peter Moyle under the direction of John Durand, and will focus upon the detection of changes in the aquatic ecosystem in response to developing stressors in the San Francisco Estuary (SFE). This time series is designed to further our understanding of the ecology and function of the fish community residing within Suisun Marsh and the San Francisco Estuary (SFE), and acts as one of the key surveys with Interagency Ecological Program's monitoring effort.
    Science topics Stage, Tides, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Pelagic fish, Benthos, Salt marsh harvest mouse, Mollusks, Crustaceans, Striped bass, Corbicula/Potamocorbula, Conductivity, Environmental drivers, Other species, Fish, Invertebrates
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Recreational Freshwater Fishing Licenses

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description California tracks the number of fishing licenses sold each year, by county.
    Science topics Fishing, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, Pelagic fish, Fish
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Hunting Licenses [waterfowl]

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description California monitors the number of hunting licenses, including waterfowl, issued by year, county and type throughout the state. They also produce annual hunting results documents that show the number of hunters, the number of animals caught, and other information pertaining to the animals, broken down by county.
    Science topics Hunting, Waterfowl, Environmental drivers
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Sacramento District Water Control Data System [WCDS]

    Lead U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE]
    Description The Sacramento District's Water Control Data System (WCDS) collects data necessary for the management of Corps Reservoirs and Flood Control Space in Non-Corps Reservoirs (i.e.,"Section 7" projects)
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Wastewater discharge, Surface water / flow, Stage, Flood, Air temperature, Precipitation, Wind, Main channels, Sloughs, Environmental drivers, Snowpack / snow water equivalent SWE, Water use / demand
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Continuous Monitoring of Water Quality & Suspended-Sediment Transport [Bay-Delta]

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description Our group at the USGS continuously monitors suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), turbidity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, and water level at many sites throughout the San Francisco Bay (Bay) and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers Delta (Delta). Our work began in 1988 to explore the spatial and temporal variability of water quality and sediment transport and to provide decision makers, resource managers, and the public with the most up-to-date knowledge. Topics we study include water quality, sediment transport, water clarity, erosion and deposition, sediment-associated contaminants and habitat quality, wetland restoration, and sea level rise.
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Surface water / flow, Stage, Velocity, Suspended sediment, Bedload, Deposition, Erosion, Chemistry, Toxicity, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, Turbidity, Other discharge contaminants, Intertidal / transition zones, Main channels, Sloughs, Open water, Riparian wildlife, Conductivity, Water use / demand, Water intakes, fish screens & passage
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Fish Restoration Program Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The Fish Restoration Program (FRP), an inter-agency agreement between the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), will restore at least 8,000 acres of tidal wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and Suisun Marsh pursuant to requirements in federal Biological Opinions and the California Incidental Take Permit for operation of the State Water Project and Central Valley Project. The rationale for restoration is that state or federally listed fish species, Delta Smelt Hypomesus transpacificus, spring-run and winter-run Central Valley Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and Longfin Smelt Spirinchus thaleichthys will benefit from increased availability of habitat and food web resources. The CDFW FRP Monitoring Team is responsible for monitoring the biological effectiveness of individual FRP tidal wetland restoration projects. Fish catch, invertebrate catch, and water quality data have been collected as baseline monitoring data and to determine the most efficient methods for monitoring wetland restoration efforts.
    Science topics Nitrogen / ammonia, Phosphorous, Carbon, Chlorophyll A / B, Phytoplankton, Other zooplankton, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Submerged aquatic vegetation, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Insects, Mollusks, Crustaceans, Invertebrates
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    National Strong Motion Project [NSMP]

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description The USGS National Strong-Motion Project (formerly titled the National Strong Motion Program) has the primary Federal responsibility for acquiring strong motion records of significant earthquakes in the United States recorded by sensors placed in the ground and in man-made structures. Currently the NSMP operates and maintains strong-motion instruments at more than 660 ground, free-field and reference sites, and more than 3200 channels of data from about 180 structural arrays. When a significant earthquake occurs, the NSMP automatically retrieves strong motion recordings from its instrumentation as well as from more than 2000 other instruments operated throughout the US by federal, state, and local agencies, private companies, and academic institutions that participate in the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). The NSMP rapidly processes these recordings according to COSMOS standards and archives the products at the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data.
    Science topics Land elevation, Subsidence, Sea level rise, Seismicity, Forests, Non-forested vegetation, Delta islands, Pacific flyway
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Atmospheric River Reconnaissance

    Lead University of California - San Diego [UCSD]
    Description CW3E works directly with water managers in the West to develop science and tools designed to better prepare for the variability inherent in the western US climate. Atmospheric River (AR) Reconnaissance (AR Recon) campaigns support improved prediction of landfalling ARs on the U.S. west coast. ARs are a type of storm that is key to the region's precipitation, flooding, and water supply. Forecasts of landfalling ARs are critical to precipitation prediction and yet are in error by +/- 400 km at even just 3-day lead time (see figure to the right;Wick et al. 2013). The concept for AR Recon was first recommended in a report to the Western States Water Council (Ralph et al. 2014) that was prepared by a broad cross-disciplinary group in 2013. AR Recon was conducted with 3 missions in 2016, 6 in 2018, and 6 in 2019. USACE and the California Department of Water Resources were key sponsors of the AR Recon 2018 and 2019 campaigns. Aircraft that are normally used for hurricane reconnaissance were deployed over the northeast Pacific to collect observations to support improved AR forecasts. The data were assimilated by global modeling centers in real-time.
    Science topics Flood, Air temperature, Precipitation, Wind, Extreme storms, Chinook Salmon, Snowpack / snow water equivalent SWE
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Central Valley Joint Venture [CVJV]

    Lead U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [USFWS]
    Description The Central Valley Joint Venture (CVJV) is a self-directed coalition consisting of 21 State and Federal agencies, private conservation organizations and one corporation. This partnership directs their efforts toward the common goal of providing for the habitat needs of migrating and resident birds in the Central Valley of California. The CVJV was established in 1988 as a regional partnership focused on the conservation of waterfowl and wetlands under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. It has since broadened its focus to the conservation of habitats for other birds, consistent with major national and international bird conservation plans and the North American Bird Conservation Initiative. The Central Valley Habitat Joint Venture was formally organized in 1988 and was one of the original six priority joint ventures formed under the NAWMP. Renamed the Central Valley Joint Venture in 2004, the Management Board now consists of nineteen public and private members. The CVJV is currently administered through a coordination office within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and is guided by a Management Board that receives input and recommendations from a variety of working committees.
    Science topics Hunting, Agriculture, Urban development, Recreation & tourism, Mudflats, Intertidal / transition zones, Above-highwater refugia, Seasonally flooded, Riparian wildlife, Waterfowl, Shorebirds, Gulls, Habitat, Non-resident / overwintering birds
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    SAIL [Coordinated Enhanced Acoustic Telemetry Program]

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description These monitoring efforts can provide critical information on juvenile salmonid distribution and survival, which inform biologists and managers interpretations of the exposure and intensity of CVP and SWP water operation risks on tagged populations in Central Valley rivers and the Bay- Delta. Understanding salmon survival and migration dynamics in the Delta and its tributaries is critical to the recovery of ESA-listed species, and sport and commercial fisheries management. For example, estimating the population size of endangered Sacramento River Winter-run Chinook (SRWRC) as they enter and exit the Delta is considered critical for informing Delta water management actions (Interagency Ecological Program (IEP) SAG 2013). “The use of realtime acoustic receivers that immediately transmit acoustic tagged (AT) fish detections needs to be included in the expanded network” (Johnson et al., in press). Tracking the fate of individual tagged fish will be accomplished with AT and used to develop estimates of survival and movement for other non-AT fish also part of that group. Population level sampling programs will use survival estimates generated by AT and applied to other mass marked (coded wire tagging) groups to develop improved capture efficiency for these sampling programs. Objectives: • Deploy and service field monitoring acoustic telemetry stations at locations important to fish and water management. • Implant, transport, and release acoustically tagged juvenile ESA-listed wild and hatchery juvenile salmonids. • Analysis and synthesis to support production and development of new metrics for understanding the survival, distribution, and entrainment of juvenile salmonid along the Sacramento River and its floodways, as well as, the Bay-Delta. Six-Year Steelhead Study Continuation Reclamation’s Proposed Action for ROC on LTO Section 4.10.5.12.3 Additional Measures includes a San Joaquin Basin Steelhead Telemetry Study -- Continuation of the 6-Year Steelhead telemetry study for the migration and survival of San Joaquin Origin Central Valley Steelhead. This investigation involves undertaking experiments utilizing acoustically-tagged salmonids to confirm proportional causes of mortality due to flows, exports, and other project and non-project adverse effects on steelhead smelt out-migrating from the San Joaquin Basin and through the southern Delta. This study is to coincide with different periods of operations and focus on clipped hatchery steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The period of interest is between February 15 and June 15, which coincides with a majority of O. mykiss outmigration from the Stanislaus River and recoveries of steelhead smolts in the Mossdale fish monitoring efforts. This period is to include changes in CVP/SWP operations that include reductions in exports, reductions in reverse flows in Old and Middle rivers (OMR), and San Joaquin River pulse flows to assess the influence of flow and exports on juvenile steelhead survival. This study is designed to evaluate juvenile steelhead route selection at channel divergences in the south Delta and along the mainstem San Joaquin River, and how these behaviors influence survival in specific reaches and through the Delta to Chipps Island.
    Science topics None specified
    Updated April 29, 2022