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  • Title

    Monitoring and Assessment of Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates Action

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates (SMSCGs) have the potential to provide an increase in low-salinity-zone habitat for endangered Delta Smelt. Operation of the SMSCGs in summer and fall to improve Delta Smelt habitat are called for in the Biological Opinion and Incidental Take permit for the Central Valley Project and State Water Project. To support the adaptive management of the action, DWR is planning to monitor the change in water quality, phytoplankton, zooplankton, fishes, and clams resulting from the action.
    Science topics Salinity, Phytoplankton, Delta Smelt
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Suisun Marsh Salinity Control Gates Action Pilot Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description In summer 2018 we used a unique water control structure in the San Francisco Estuary to direct a managed flow pulse into Suisun Marsh. Field monitoring showed that turbidity and chlorophyll were at higher levels in Suisun Marsh, representing better habitat conditions, than the upstream Sacramento River region throughout the study period. Fish monitoring data suggested that small numbers of Delta Smelt colonized Suisun Marsh from the Sacramento River during the 2018 Flow Action.
    Science topics Salinity, Phytoplankton, Delta Smelt
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Delta Regional Monitoring Program

    Lead San Francisco Estuary Institute [SFEI]
    Description The Delta Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) is a stakeholder-directed project formed to develop water quality data necessary for improving our understanding of Delta water quality issues.
    Science topics Hg and methyl mercury, Insecticides, Rodenticides, Herbicides, Fungicides, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Striped bass, Fish
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    California Partners In Flight [CalPIF]

    Lead Point Blue Conservation Science
    Description The CalPIF mission is to promote the conservation of resident and migratory landbirds and their habitats in California through research, monitoring, education, and collaboration among public and private landowners and managers, government agencies, non-government organizations, and individuals and other bird conservation efforts. The California chapter of Partners in Flight (CalPIF) was established in 1992. The California Partners in Flight program has completed eight habitat and bioregion based Bird Conservation Plans (BCP's) for Riparian, Oak Woodlands, Coastal Scrub and Chaparral, Grasslands, Coniferous Forests, Sagebrush, Desert, and the Sierra Nevada Bioregion. These BCPs are for every land manager and researcher interested in improving habitat for landbirds. These plans are dynamic documents that will follow a continous process of developing and updating conservation recommendations for California's habitats based on the latest scientific monitoring and research data.
    Science topics Mudflats, Intertidal / transition zones, Above-highwater refugia, Seasonally flooded, Open water, Managed ponds, Riparian wildlife, Forests, Non-forested vegetation, Delta islands, Pacific flyway, Waterfowl, Shorebirds, Gulls, Non-resident / overwintering birds
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    State Water Project - Reservoir Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The State Water Project (DWR) is responsible for maintaining and monitoring water levels in several key reservoirs in California. The reservoirs of focus (largest capacity) within the CVP are Oroville, San Luis, Pyramid, Perris, and Castaic. San Luis is jointly monitored by USBR and DWR. Reservoir storage, elevation, inflow, and outflow are monitored daily, with some parameters at certain reservoirs being monitored hourly or monthly, and reported to the California Data Exchange Center (CDEC) for public access.
    Science topics Water storage, Surface water / flow, Stage, Flood, Main channels
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Water Quality Data for California

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description The USGS collects and analyzes chemical, physical, and biological properties of water, sediment and tissue samples from across the Nation. The Water Data for the Nation discrete sample data base is a compilation of over 4.4 million historical water quality analyses in the USGS district data bases through September 2005. The discrete sample data is a large and complex set of data that has been collected by a variety of projects ranging from national programs to studies in small watersheds.
    Science topics Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Discrete dissolved oxygen monitoring in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description Dissolved oxygen levels in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Chanel (SDWSC) have been monitored since 1968 by the Interagency Ecological Program's (IEP) Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP). The SDWSC is located on the San Joaquin River near Stockton, California. Beginning in 1997, 14 stations were routinely monitored typically in summer and fall. Dissolved oxygen impairment can occur in the SDWSC;therefore, two water quality objectives were established.
    Science topics Chlorophyll A / B, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Main channels, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    20-mm Survey [Delta Smelt distribution monitoring]

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) conducts the 20-mm Survey annually to monitor the distribution and relative abundance of larval and juvenile Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) in the upper San Francisco Bay Estuary. The survey began in 1995 and supplies near real-time catch data to water and fisheries managers as part of an adaptive management strategy to limit the risk of Delta Smelt entrainment during water exports Data collected: temperature, electro-conductivity, water transparency, turbidity, water volume, tidal stage, fish, and zooplankton.
    Science topics Stage, Tides, Other zooplankton, Water temperature, Turbidity, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Benthos
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    State Water Project

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The California State Water Project (SWP) is a water storage and delivery system of reservoirs, aqueducts, power plants and pumping plants extending more than 700 miles - two-thirds the length of California. Planned, constructed, and operated by the Department of Water Resources, the SWP is the nation's largest state-built, multi-purpose, user-financed water project. It supplies water to more than 27 million people in northern California, the Bay Area, the San Joaquin Valley, the Central Coast and southern California. SWP water also irrigates about 750,000 acres of farmland, mainly in the San Joaquin Valley.
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Surface water / flow, Stage, Main channels, Habitat
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    San Francisco Bay Bathymetry

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description USGS has conducted bathymetric analyses in San Francisco Bay, Suisun Bay, and the Delta intermittently since 1867 based on bathymetry data primarily collected by NOAA"s National Ocean Service (NOS) (formerly the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (USCGS)). Since the days of hydraulic gold mining, sedimentation in San Francisco Bay has changed drastically. From the 1850's until at least the late 1800's, debris from hydraulic mining in the Sierra Nevada filled the Bay. As hydraulic mining practices ceased, the amount of sediment deposited decreased. In the latter half of the 20th century an increase in the implementation of flood control and water distribution projects in the Central Valley caused the Bay to be erosional due to the reduction of the frequency and duration of peak flow conditions, which in turn decreased sediment supply to the Bay. They have used this information to locate deposits of sediment-associated contaminants, restore wetland areas, and to provide the observable linkage between anthropogenic modifications of the landscape—such as evolving land use practices, flood control, and water diversions—and natural forces of climate-driven river flow, sea level change, tides, and wind. In 1999, USGS assessed how sedimentation in the Suisun Bay has changed between 1867 and 1990 (see info sources). They have also worked collaboratively with DWR, using their more recent bathymetry data to produce a high-resolution DEM of the Delta region (see info sources). It is not clear whether USGS will continue their bathymetry surveys. The latest survey is from 2005, and took place in the South of San Francisco Bay (outside the Delta study area).
    Science topics Flood, Land elevation, Bedload, Deposition, Erosion, Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    San Francisco Bay Study

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The San Francisco Bay Study (Bay Study) was established in 1980 to determine the effects of freshwater outflow on the abundance and distribution of fish and mobile crustaceans in the San Francisco Estuary, primarily downstream of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Sampling ranges from south of the Dumbarton Bridge in South San Francisco Bay, to just west of Alcatraz Island in Central San Francisco Bay, throughout San Pablo and Suisun bays, north to the confluence Steamboat and Cache sloughs on the Sacramento River, and east to Old River Flats on the San Joaquin River. The open water or boat survey samples 52 stations monthly: 35 original stations, 7 stations added in 1988, 4 stations added in 1991, and 6 stations added in 1994. The study included a beach seine survey, discontinued in 1987, and a shore-based ringnet survey for crabs, discontinued in 1994. The Bay Study uses a 42-foot stern trawler to sample with 2 trawl nets at each open water station. The otter trawl, which samples demersal fishes, shrimp, and crabs, is towed against the current at a standard engine rpm for 5 minutes then retrieved. The midwater trawl, which samples pelagic fishes, is towed with the current at a standard engine rpm for 12 minutes and retrieved obliquely such that all depths are sampled equally. The open water survey included a plankton net that sampled larval fish and crustaceans, but this was discontinued in 1989. Fish, caridean shrimp, and brachyuran crabs are identified, measured, and counted. Shrimp and crabs are also sexed. Sampling effort is quantified (i.e. distance towed, volume of water filtered) and salinity, water temperature, Secchi depth, and station depth are measured;wave height, tide, cloud cover, and tow direction are categorized. The length, catch, and effort data is used to calculate catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) by species and age class. The CPUE data is used to calculate monthly and annual abundance indices, which are used to track seasonal and annual population trends. Important factors that control or regulate abundance and distribution of fish and mobile crustaceans in the estuary include salinity, temperature, freshwater outflow, ocean temperature, upwelling, and surface currents, primary and secondary productivity, and introduced species. We are interested in how species respond to changes in the physical environment on several temporal scales - seasonal, annual, decadal, and longer. We produce several annual Status and Trends reports that summarize recent changes for the most commonly collected species. These reports are published in the Spring issue of the IEP Newsletter, which can be found at http://iep.water.ca.gov/report/newsletter. The 1999 IEP Technical Report, "Report on the 1980-1995 Fish, Shrimp, and Crab Sampling in the San Francisco Estuary, California", is a good source of basic information. This report is out-of-print, but can be found at www.water.ca.gov/iep/docs/tech_rpts/tech_rprt_63_toc.html. website: https://water.ca.gov/-/media/DWR-Website/Web-Pages/Programs/Environmental-Services/Interagency-Ecological-Program/Files/2019-IEP-Work-Plan_2018-12-11.pdf?la=en&hash=C305D1B1DA7931D95E8676247669F098F26A28FA
    Science topics Water temperature, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Crustaceans, Conductivity, Mammals
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Fisheries Branch Anadromous Assessment

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Fisheries Branch Anadromous Assessment Unit compiles annual population estimates of Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. Estimates are based on counts of fish entering hatcheries and migrating past dams, carcass surveys, live fish counts, creel census data, and ground and aerial redd counts.
    Science topics Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater, Seasonally flooded, Open water, Chinook Salmon
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Smelt Larva Survey

    Lead California State Water Resources Control Board [SWRCB]
    Description The Smelt Larva Survey provides near real-time distribution data for longfin smelt larvae in the Delta, Suisun Bay and Suisun Marsh. Sampling takes place within the first two weeks in January and repeats every other week through the second week in March. Each 4-day survey consists of a single 10-minute oblique tow conducted at each of the 35 survey locations (see map) using an egg and larva net. The 505-micron mesh net is hung on a rigid frame shaped like an inverted-U, which in turn is attached to skis to prevent it from digging into the bottom when deployed. The net mouth area measures 0.37 m2. The conical net tapers back from the frame 3.35 m to a 1-liter cod-end jar, which collects and concentrates the sample. Immediately after each tow, juvenile fishes are removed, identified, measured and returned to the water immediately, and the remaining larvae are preserved in 10% formalin for later identification in the Lab in Stockton.
    Science topics Stage, Salinity, Water temperature, Turbidity, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Conductivity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Spring Kodiak Trawl Survey

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The Spring Kodiak Trawl Survey (SKT) has sampled annually since its inception in 2002. The SKT determines the relative abundance and distribution of spawning delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus). The SKT samples 40 stations each month from January to May. These 40 stations range from San Pablo Bay upstream to Stockton on the San Joaquin River, Walnut Grove on the Sacramento River, and the Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel. Each 'Delta-wide' survey takes approximately 4 - 5 days per month to complete. Historically, 'Delta-wide' surveys were followed by a 'Supplemental' survey two weeks later to intensively sample areas of highest delta smelt concentration to estimate the proportion of male and female delta smelt that were in pre-spawning, spawning and spent maturation stages. Beginning in 2008, in an effort to minimize take of spawning adults, routine 'Supplemental' surveys were discontinued and are now only conducted under the recommendation of the Smelt Working Group and the approval of managers.
    Science topics Stage, Salinity, Water temperature, Turbidity, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Conductivity, Other species
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Summer Townet Survey

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The Summer Townet (STN) Survey was initiated in 1959 to determine relative distribution and abundance of young of the year (age-0) striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Delta. To predict fishery recruitment, the survey calculates an index to measure age-0 striped bass year class strength. This index is based on abundance when age-0 striped bass attain a mean length of 38.1 mm. In contrast, the delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) index is the average of the first two survey indices. The delta smelt index was developed about 1990 in response to declining delta smelt abundance. It has proven valuable in gauging the health of the estuary;delta smelt abundance trend data was used as supporting evidence for their listing as threatened in 1992 under the Federal and State Endangered Species Acts. It appears that zooplankton data are also collected.
    Science topics Mysis, Other zooplankton, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Striped bass, Fish
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Zooplankton Study

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Zooplankton Study has estimated the abundance of zooplankton taxa since 1972 as a means of assessing trends in fish food resources from eastern San Pablo Bay through the eastern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and Suisun Marsh. The study also detects and monitors zooplankton recently introduced to the estuary and determines their effects on native species. Under the auspices of the Interagency Ecological Program for the San Francisco Estuary and mandated by Water Right Decision D-1641, the Zooplankton Study is part of the Environmental Monitoring Program and is conducted by the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), California Department of Water Resources (CDWR), and the United States Bureau of Reclamation. The Zooplankton Study currently samples 19 stations monthly, including 17 fixed stations and 2 floating entrapment zone stations located at bottom electrical conductivity (EC) of 2 and 6 mS/cm. Three additional stations are sampled in Carquinez Strait and San Pablo Bay during high outflow when surface EC is less than 20mS/cm.
    Science topics Mysis, Other zooplankton, Main channels, Sloughs, Crustaceans, Invertebrates
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Delta Juvenile Fish Monitoring Program [DJFMP]

    Lead U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [USFWS]
    Description The abundance of juvenile Chinook Salmon (all races) emigrating from the Central Valley's tributaries on their way to the ocean is estimated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Delta Juvenile Fish Monitoring Program that operates in and around the Delta. The Delta Juvenile Fish Monitoring Program (DJFMP) conducts annual monitoring of juvenile fishes, participates in multi-agency research activities, and contributes to several technical and management committees within the region.
    Science topics Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, Turbidity, Main channels, Sloughs, Chinook Salmon, Crustaceans, Fish, Invertebrates
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Fish Salvage and Genetic Analysis

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description The State Water Project (SWP), operated by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR), and the Central Valley Project (CVP), operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, export water out of the San Francisco Bay Delta for urban and agricultural use in California. Salvage of fish at both facilities is conducted 24 hours a day, seven days a week at regular intervals. Since 1957, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) has salvaged fish at the Tracy Fish Collection Facility (TFCF). CDFW's Fish Facilities Unit, in cooperation with DWR, began salvaging fish at the Skinner Delta Fish Protective Facility (SDFPF) in 1968. Fish salvage and loss rates are used to determine the need for changes in operations in response to National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) regulatory requirements. Salvage and loss monitoring includes daily monitoring and reporting of estimated loss of salvaged fish, as well as monitoring and reporting of salvaged Coded Wired Tagged (CWT) hatchery fish. This information is widely used by West Coast fisheries agencies to collect information on natural and hatchery-reared stocks of salmon and steelhead. Our state-of-the-art genetic analysis techniques are used to quantify salvage rates of listed runs of California's Central Valley juvenile Chinook Salmon. We also utilize advanced genetic analysis techniques to identify different populations of Central Valley juvenile Chinook Salmon, and actively participate in development of new analysis methods.
    Science topics Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Striped bass, Fish, Invasive / non native species
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description California Department of Water Resources (DWR) has operated a fisheries monitoring program in the Yolo Bypass, a seasonal floodplain and tidal slough, since 1998. The objectives of the Yolo Bypass Fish Monitoring Program (YBFMP) are to: (1) collect baseline data on lower trophic levels (phytoplankton, zooplankton, and aquatic insects), juvenile fish and adult fish, hydrology, and water quality parameters;(2) investigation of the temporal and seasonal patterns in chlorophyll-a concentrations, including whether high concentrations are exported from the Bypass during agricultural and natural flow events and the possibility of manipulating bypass flows to benefit listed species like Delta Smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). The YBFMP operates a rotary screw trap and fyke trap, and conducts biweekly beach seine and lower trophic surveys in addition to maintaining water quality instrumentation in the bypass. The YBFMP serves to fill information gaps regarding environmental conditions in the bypass that trigger migrations and enhanced survival and growth of native fishes, as well as provide data for IEP synthesis efforts.
    Science topics Surface water / flow, Stage, Velocity, Direction, Tides, Flood, Chlorophyll A / B, Phytoplankton, Other zooplankton, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, pH, Turbidity, Other discharge contaminants, Mudflats, Intertidal / transition zones, Main channels, Chinook Salmon, Steelhead Trout, Green sturgeon, White Sturgeon, Delta Smelt, Longfin Smelt, Sacramento Splittail, Insects, Striped bass, Conductivity, Saltwater / freshwater marshes, Fish, Invasive / non native species
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Sacramento District Water Control Data System [WCDS]

    Lead U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE]
    Description The Sacramento District's Water Control Data System (WCDS) collects data necessary for the management of Corps Reservoirs and Flood Control Space in Non-Corps Reservoirs (i.e.,"Section 7" projects)
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Wastewater discharge, Surface water / flow, Stage, Flood, Air temperature, Precipitation, Wind, Main channels, Sloughs, Environmental drivers, Snowpack / snow water equivalent SWE, Water use / demand
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Invasive Species Program

    Lead California Department of Fish and Wildlife [CDFW]
    Description The mission of the Invasive Species Program is to reduce the negative effects of non-native invasive species on the wildlands and waterways of California. We are involved in efforts to prevent the introduction of these species into the state, detect and respond to introductions when they occur, and prevent the spread of invasive species that have become established. The Quagga/Zebra program particularly relies heavily on water quality data, as the species will not establish in waters with low calcium. Therefore they rely substantially on water quality data collected and housed by others (primarily DWR). A large part of their effort is in training other state or private recreational agencies to recognize and report the species, and therefore also reported by others.
    Science topics Mudflats, Intertidal / transition zones, Main channels, Sloughs, Backwater, Submerged aquatic vegetation, Floating aquatic vegetation, Open water, Managed ponds, Waterfowl, Insects, Mollusks, Crustaceans, Corbicula/Potamocorbula, Nutria, Water hyacinth, Brazilian waterweed, Spongeplant, Giant reed, Yellow star thistle, Saltwater / freshwater marshes, Other species, Mammals, Amphibians and reptiles, Invasive / non native species
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Continuous Monitoring of Water Quality & Suspended-Sediment Transport [Bay-Delta]

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description Our group at the USGS continuously monitors suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), turbidity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, and water level at many sites throughout the San Francisco Bay (Bay) and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers Delta (Delta). Our work began in 1988 to explore the spatial and temporal variability of water quality and sediment transport and to provide decision makers, resource managers, and the public with the most up-to-date knowledge. Topics we study include water quality, sediment transport, water clarity, erosion and deposition, sediment-associated contaminants and habitat quality, wetland restoration, and sea level rise.
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Water storage, Water conveyance / infrastructure, Surface water / flow, Stage, Velocity, Suspended sediment, Bedload, Deposition, Erosion, Chemistry, Toxicity, Salinity, Water temperature, Dissolved oxygen, Turbidity, Other discharge contaminants, Intertidal / transition zones, Main channels, Sloughs, Open water, Riparian wildlife, Conductivity, Water use / demand, Water intakes, fish screens & passage
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Suisun Marsh Monitoring Program

    Lead California Department of Water Resource [DWR]
    Description The Suisun Marsh Monitoring Program is a monitoring program to collect data on surface and soil water quality, water elevations, vegetation, and wildlife species, required by the Suisun Marsh Preservation Agreement (SMPA) that was signed by DWR, the California Department of Fish and Game (DFG), U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and Suisun Resource Conservation District (SRCD).
    Science topics Water operations / exports, Salinity
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    National Water Use Science Project [NWUSP]

    Lead U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]
    Description The USGS National Water Use Science Project (NWUSP), a component of the Water Availability and Use Science Program (WAUSP), facilitates the 5-year compilation of water use estimates for the United States as part of the National Water Census (NWC). The NWC, implemented as part of the SECURE (Science and Engineering to Comprehensively Understand and Responsibly Enhance) Water Act (Subtitle F of Public Law 111-11, the Omnibus Public Land Management Act), provides data and tools designed to support water managers in the accurate assessment of water availability at regional and national scales (https://water.usgs.gov/ watercensus/). Water managers across the United States require more complete, timely, and accurate water-availability information to support policy and decision-making, specifically, data associated with water withdrawals and consumptive use. Recognizing the limitations of current water-use data, the SECURE Water Act authorized a program that supports activities related to data collection and methods research and development at the State level. The USGS Water-Use Data and Research program (WUDR) will provide financial assistance through cooperative agreements with State water resource agencies to improve the availability, quality, compatibility, and delivery of water-use data that is collected or estimated by States. The Act requires that these State water use and availability datasets be integrated with appropriate datasets that are developed and/or maintained by the USGS.
    Science topics Surface water / flow, Groundwater, Water use / demand
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Central Valley Joint Venture [CVJV]

    Lead U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [USFWS]
    Description The Central Valley Joint Venture (CVJV) is a self-directed coalition consisting of 21 State and Federal agencies, private conservation organizations and one corporation. This partnership directs their efforts toward the common goal of providing for the habitat needs of migrating and resident birds in the Central Valley of California. The CVJV was established in 1988 as a regional partnership focused on the conservation of waterfowl and wetlands under the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. It has since broadened its focus to the conservation of habitats for other birds, consistent with major national and international bird conservation plans and the North American Bird Conservation Initiative. The Central Valley Habitat Joint Venture was formally organized in 1988 and was one of the original six priority joint ventures formed under the NAWMP. Renamed the Central Valley Joint Venture in 2004, the Management Board now consists of nineteen public and private members. The CVJV is currently administered through a coordination office within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and is guided by a Management Board that receives input and recommendations from a variety of working committees.
    Science topics Hunting, Agriculture, Urban development, Recreation & tourism, Mudflats, Intertidal / transition zones, Above-highwater refugia, Seasonally flooded, Riparian wildlife, Waterfowl, Shorebirds, Gulls, Habitat, Non-resident / overwintering birds
    Updated April 29, 2022
  • Title

    Sacramento River Basin Salmonid Monitoring with Pacific States

    Lead U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [USBR]
    Description This study aims to monitor effectiveness of salmonid habitat improvement projects in the Sacramento River basin. Annual Chinook escapement estimates in Sacramento River and upper river tributaries and American, and habitat project juvenile monitoring.
    Science topics Chinook Salmon
    Updated April 29, 2022